Homeboy Sandman on Hip Hop Fueling Prisons

Share


We first made wind of Homeboy Sandman via his Lighting Bolt video, a few years back.  This was definantly a gem and breathe of fresh air in a world smothered by popular destructive hip hop. Little did we know that we’d be contacting him years later to spread his insight on the relationship of popular hip hop and the prison industrial complex. We thank homeboy Sandman for allowing us to share his recent article entitled “Jailhouse Roc: The FACTS About Hip Hop and Prison for Profit”. It shares the sentiments understood by the conscious and many grassroot movements.

It outlines how popular hip hop is strategically used to create prisoners(slaves), by what we understand by the right of the 13th amendment which states that “Neither slavery nor involuntary servitude, except as a punishment for crime whereof the party shall have been duly convicted, shall exist within the United States, or any place subject to their jurisdiction.” Formally abolishing slavery in the United States, the 13th Amendment was passed by the Congress on January 31, 1865, and ratified by the states on December 6, 1865.

A worldy MC. From Long Island to London, a teacher, ex ivy leaguer, in 2006 Homeboy decided to follow his passion for hip hop. Before signing to Stones Throw he’d already been chosen as a coach on MTV’s MADE, featured in preeminent print hip-hop rags XXL and The Source, and perpetually championed on foremost online hubs. And since the signing, his accolades have extended beyond the realm of the hip hop specific. Rolling Stone has noted his “skill for wordplay that keeps you hooked.” NPR has highlighted his “artful, hysterical, disobedient hip-hop that you can dance to.” Pitchfork has straightforwardly dubbed him “one of the best pure lyricists around.”

I’m still black thought’s biggest fan, just now I can call him and tell him so…

He writes regularly for The Huffington Post, some for Gawker. While most of his writing is music, it appears he’ll write wherever a lot of people are looking. If he had an opportunity to give a speech at a huge rally he’d take that too, so more than anything else he just wants to spread the word.

JAILHOUSE ROC: THE FACTS ABOUT HIP HOP AND PRISON FOR PROFIT BY HOMEBOY SANDMAN

Homeboy Sandman

Homeboy Sandman

GoldenUndergroundTV recently released an interview I did with them late last year. I got a bit animated at the end. Only so many interviews in a row I could handle being asked about Chief Keef.

My tirade wasn’t really about Chief Keef. It wasn’t about Gucci Mane or Wocka Flocka or any of the acts spontaneously catapulted into stardom by synchronized mass media coverage despite seemingly universal indifference (at the very best) regarding their talent. Whose arrests, involvement in underaged pregnancies, concert shootouts, and facial tattoos, dominate conversation for weeks at a time, with their actual music a mere afterthought, if thought of at all.

My tirade was about marketing. It was about media powers seeking out the biggest pretend criminal kingpins they can find, (many of whom who shamelessly adopt the names of actual real life criminal kingpins like 50 Cent and Rick Ross), and exalting them as the poster children for a culture. It was about an art form reduced to product placement, the selling of a lifestyle, and ultimately, a huge ad for imprisonment.

This is not my opinion.

Corrections Corporation of America

Last year Corrections Corporation of America (CCA), the biggest name in the private prison industry, contacted 48 states offering to buy their prisons. One stipulation of eligibility for the deal was particularly bizarre: “an assurance by the agency partner that the agency has sufficient inmate population to maintain a minimum 90% occupancy rate over the term of the contract.

What kind of legitimate and ethical measures could possibly be taken to ensure the maintenance of a 90% prison occupancy rate?

Two months later an anonymous email was sent out to various members of the music and publishing industries giving an account of a meeting where it was determined that hip-hop music would be manipulated to drive up privatized prison profits. Its author, despite claiming to be a former industry insider, did not provide the names of anyone involved in the plot, nor did he specify by which company he himself was employed. As such, the letter was largely regarded as a fraud for lack of facts.

Here are facts:

stop-big-media-187x203

Ninety percent of what Americans read, watch and listen to is controlled by only six media companies. PBS’s Frontline has described the conglomerates that determine what information is disseminated to the public as a “web of business relationships that now defines America’s media and culture.” Business relationships. Last year a mere 232 media executives were responsible for the intake of 277 million Americans, controlling all the avenues necessary to manufacture any celebrity and incite any trend. Time Warner, as owner of Warner Bros Records (among many other record labels), can not only sign an artist to a recording contract but, as the owner of Entertainment Weekly, can see to it that they get next week’s cover. Also the owner of New Line Cinemas, HBO and TNT, they can have their artist cast in a leading role in a film that, when pulled from theaters, will be put into rotation first on premium, then on basic, cable. Without any consideration to the music whatsoever, the artist will already be a star, though such monopolies also extend into radio stations and networks that air music videos. For consumers, choice is often illusory. Both BET and MTV belong to Viacom. While Hot 97, NYC’s top hip hop station, is owned by Emmis Communications, online streaming is controlled by Clear Channel, who also owns rival station Power 105.

None of this is exactly breaking news, but when ownership of these media conglomerates is cross checked with ownership of the biggest names in prison privatization, interesting new facts emerge.

Vanguard Group

According to public analysis from Bloomberg, the largest holder in Corrections Corporation of America isVanguard Group Incorporated. Interestingly enough, Vanguard also holds considerable stake in the media giants determining this country’s culture. In fact, Vanguard is the third largest holder in both Viacom and Time Warner. Vanguard is also the third largest holder in the GEO Group, whose correctional, detention and community reentry services boast 101 facilities, approximately 73,000 beds and 18,000 employees. Second nationally only to Corrections Corporation of America, GEO’s facilities are located not only in the United States but in the United Kingdom, Australia and South Africa.

You may be thinking, “Well, Vanguard is only the third largest holder in those media conglomerates, which is no guarantee that they’re calling any shots.” Well, the number-one holder of both Viacom and Time Warner is a company called Blackrock. Blackrock is the second largest holder in Corrections Corporation of America, second only to Vanguard, and the sixth largest holder in the GEO Group.

There are many other startling overlaps in private-prison/mass-media ownership, but two underlying facts become clear very quickly: The people who own the media are the same people who own private prisons, the EXACT same people, and using one to promote the other is (or “would be,” depending on your analysis) very lucrative.

Such a scheme would mean some very greedy, very racist people.

There are facts to back that up, too.

Prison industry lobbyists developing and encouraging criminal justice policies to advance financial interests has been well-documented. The most notorious example is the Washington-based American Legislative Council, a policy organization funded by CCA and GEO, which successfully championed the incarceration promoting “truth in sentencing” and “three-strikes” sentencing laws. If the motive of the private prison industry were the goodhearted desire to get hold of inmates as quickly as possible for the purpose of sooner successfully rehabilitating them, maintenance of a 90% occupancy rate would be considered a huge failure, not a functioning prerequisite.

Likewise, the largest rise in incarceration that this country has ever seen correlates precisely with early-80′s prison privatization. This despite the fact that crime rates actually declined since this time. This decreasing crime rate was pointed out enthusiastically by skeptics eager to debunk last year’s anonymous industry insider, who painted a picture of popularized hip-hop as a tool for imprisoning masses.  What wasn’t pointed out was that despite crime rates going down, incarceration rates have skyrocketed. While the size of the prison population changed dramatically, so did its complexion. In “‘All Eyez on Me’: America’s War on Drugs and the Prison-Industrial Complex,” Andre Douglas Pond Cummings documents the obvious truth that “the vast majority of the prisoner increase in the United States has come from African-American and Latino citizen drug arrests.”

war-on-drugs

Add to this well-documented statistics proving that the so-called “war on drugs” has been waged almost entirely on low-income communities of color, where up until just two years ago, cocaine sold in crack form fetched sentences 100 times as lengthy as the exact same amount of cocaine sold in powdered form, which is much more common in cocaine arrests in affluent communities. (In July 2010 the oddly named Fair Sentencing Act was adopted, which, rather than reducing the crack/powder disparity from 100-to-1 to 1-to-1, reduced it to 18-to-1, which is still grossly unfair.) This is not to suggest that the crack/powder disparity represents the extent of the racism rampant within the incarceration industry. The U.S. Sentencing Commission reported in March 2010 that in the federal prison system, even where convicted for the exact same crimes, people of color received prison sentences 10% longer . Where convictions are identical, mandatory minimum sentences are also 21% more likely for people of color.

Finally, let us not forget the wealth of evidence to support the notion that crime-, drug- and prison-glorifying hip-hop only outsells other hip-hop because it receives so much more exposure and financial backing, and that when given equal exposure, talent is a much more reliable indicator of success than content.

Mos def

Yasiin Bey aka Mos def

Yasiin Bey (formerly Mos Def) put it best; “‘hip-hop” is just shorthand for ‘black people.’” Before our eyes and ears, a “web of business relationships that now defines America’s media and culture” has one particular business raking in billions of dollars while another defines the culture of a specific demographic as criminal. Both business are owned by the same people. Mainstream media continue to endorse hip-hop that glorifies criminality (most notably drug trafficking and violence), and private prison interests, long since proven to value profits over human rights, usher in inmates of color to meet capacity quotas. The same people disproportionately incarcerated when exposed to the criminal justice system are at every turn inundated with media normalizing incarceration to the point that wherever there is mainstream hip-hop music, reference to imprisonment as an ordinary, even expected, component of life is sure to follow.

Conspiracy theorists get a lot of flak for daring entertain the notion that people will do evil things for money. Historical atrocities like slavery and the Holocaust are universally acknowledged, yet simultaneously adopted is the contradictory position that there can’t possibly be any human beings around intelligent enough and immoral enough to perpetrate such things.  Even in the midst of the Europe-wide beef that was actually horse-meat fiasco, and the release of real-life nightmare documenting films like “Sunshine and Oranges,” there is an abundance of people content to believe that the only conspiracies that ever exist are those that have successfully been exposed.

The link between mass media and the prison industrial complex, however, is part of a very different type of conversation.

The information in this article was not difficult to find; it is all public.

This is not a conspiracy. This is a fact.

Time Warner Cable Holdings

Viacom Prison Holdings

CCA Holdings

Private Prisons Public Functions

All Eyes on Me.. War on Drugs

written by Homeboy Sandman

Homeboy Sandman is a musician. His genre is hip-hop. An emcee that prides himself on musical growth and evolution, he has adopted as his motto and creative mission statement, “Boy Sand like you’ve never seen him before. As usual.”

Raised in Queens NY. Academic stints in New Hampshire, Philadelphia, London and Long Island. One semester short on two different graduate degrees. A couple of years of NYC Public School teaching thrown in there in between. 9th and 10th grades. Some bartending too, at the legendary Lennox Lounge in Harlem. That’s where Shaft used to drink.

December 2006 he decides to cut all that miscellaneous nonsense and follow his passion. His first album came the following year.

Before signing to Stones Throw he’d already been chosen as a coach on MTV’s MADE, featured in preeminent print hip-hop rags XXL and The Source, and perpetually championed on foremost online hubs. And since the signing, his accolades have extended beyond the realm of the hip hop specific. Rolling Stone has noted his “skill for wordplay that keeps you hooked.” NPR has highlighted his “artful, hysterical, disobedient hip-hop that you can dance to.” Pitchfork has straightforwardly dubbed him “one of the best pure lyricists around.”

He writes regularly for The Huffington Post, some for Gawker. While most of his writing is music, it appears he’ll write wherever a lot of people are looking. If he had an opportunity to give a speech at a huge rally he’d take that too, so more than anything else he just wants to spread the word. Maybe he just wants attention. Attention for being himself though.

source_http://www.stonesthrow.com
http://hiphopandpolitics.wordpress.com/2013/04/24/jailhouse-roc-the-facts-about-hip-hop-and-prison-for-profit/

5 thoughts on “Homeboy Sandman on Hip Hop Fueling Prisons

  1. Phoebe says:

    Hi, I do thinκ this is an excеllent wеbsite.
    I stumbledupon іt 😉 I may retuгn oncе аgain sincе i haѵe bоok mаrκed it.
    Monеy anԁ fгеedom is the greаteѕt wаy tο chаnge,
    may you be rich аnԁ сοntinue
    to helρ оtheг peoρlе.

  2. B says:

    The toughened reality of living in these neighborhoods is what shaped Drill music, a slang term for retaliation and a new style of hip-hop that represents a turning away from Chicago’s socially conscious wave represented by Kanye West, Common, Lupe Fiasco, the Cool Kids and others to a darker, more hard-core sound, recognized by sinister keyboards, brittle beats and voyeuristic tales involving girls, Kush smoking, but primarily violence.

    “The way they deliver their lyrics is a different style than the way everyone is used to,” Chicago’s DJ Reese told BET recently. “It promotes violence to a certain degree, but that’s all they have to talk about right now. Until they get that out of their system, they’re not going to have anything else to talk about.”

    (from this article; http://www.salon.com/2012/12/18/raps_killer_new_rhymes/ )

  3. B says:

    THE WAR ON DRUGS CAUSES HIGH INCARCERATION RATES – NOT GANGSTA RAP.
    by Dj Synchotronic
    ******** ( from the article )
    Last year Corrections Corporation of America (CCA), the biggest name in the private prison industry, contacted 48 states offering to buy their prisons. One stipulation
    of eligibility for the deal was particularly bizarre: “an assurance by the agency partner that the agency has sufficient inmate population to maintain a minimum 90%
    occupancy rate over the term of the contract.

    (response) It IS a bizarre claim, because prisons are ALREADY FULL!
    Locals jails =86% State prisons =136% Federal prisons =136%
    [World Prison Brief: Country – United States of America”. International Centre for Prison Studies.In fact the Geo Group (mentioned later) already has”an average facility occupancy rate of 95.7% for 2012.”2012 Annual Report”. GEO Group. Retrieved 7 April 2013.]

    ******** (from the article)
    What kind of legitimate and ethical measures could possibly be taken to ensure the maintenance of a 90% prison occupancy rate?

    (response) Don’t have to do anything except buy prisons and keep the drugs moving!

    ******** (from the article)
    “Two months later an anonymous email was sent”

    (response) A google ‘search by year’ finds a link to this letter as early as 31 January 2001 on usahitman.com/ntscsa/

    ******** (from the article)
    “anonymous email”

    (response) no references, sources or anything to suggest credibility.

    ******** (from the article)
    “…it was determined that hip-hop music would be manipulated to drive up privatized prison profits.”

    (response) How exactly? This is similar to the long running debate over whether video games cause violence, or that listening to Kiss or ACDC means you will to hell!
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Moral_panichttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Folk_devilhttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Video_game_controversies#Crime_and_violence

    If this were true it would show in statistics – there would be higher arrest rates when a gangsta rap album is in the charts!

    ******** (from the article)
    “Its author, despite claiming to be a former industry insider, did not provide the names of anyone involved in the plot, nor did he specify by which company he himself
    was employed.”

    (response) Exactly, no references, sources or anything to suggest credibility.

    ******** (from the article)
    “Ninety percent of what Americans read, watch and listen to is controlled by only six media companies”

    (response) The ‘Big Six’ is true, unsure where the 90% figure originaly comes from.
    [http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Media_cross-ownership_in_the_United_States]

    ******** (from the article)
    “the largest holder in Corrections Corporation of America is Vanguard Group Incorporated”

    (response) This is true, the source is http://finance.yahoo.com/q/mhs=CXW+Major+Holders

    ******** (from the article)
    “In fact, Vanguard is the third largest holder in both Viacom and Time Warner.”

    (response) Vanguard is not listed as a Major Owner of viacom.
    http://au.finance.yahoo.com/q/mh?s=TWX
    http://au.finance.yahoo.com/q/mh?s=VIA

    ******** (from the article)
    “Vanguard is also the third largest holder in the GEO Group”

    (response) This is true, the source is http://au.finance.yahoo.com/q/mh?s=GEO

    ******** (from the article)
    “GEO Group, whose correctional, detention and community reentry services boast 101 facilities, approximately 73,000 beds and 18,000 employees. Second nationally only to
    Corrections Corporation of America, GEO’s facilities are located not only in the United States but in the United Kingdom, Australia and South Africa.”

    (response) This is true, the source is http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/GEO_Group#cite_note-Annual-7

    ******** (from the article)
    “Well, the number-one holder of both Viacom and Time Warner is a company called Blackrock”

    (response) Blackrock is NOT listed as a major holder in Viacom. http://au.finance.yahoo.com/q/mh?s=VIA
    Blackrock is a major holder in TimeWarner but is not the number one holder. http://au.finance.yahoo.com/q/mh?s=TWX

    ******** (from the article)
    “Blackrock is the second largest holder in Corrections Corporation of America, second only to Vanguard”

    (response) Blackrock is NOT a major holder, Vanguard is. http://au.finance.yahoo.com/q/mh?s=CXW

    ******** (from the article)
    “There are many other startling overlaps in private-prison/mass-media ownership”

    (response) It is not startling when you consider that the aim of any business is ultimately to make money and increase in size. The Rothchilds own shares in most top
    companies http://www.dailypaul.com/223527/rothschilds-appear-to-hold-shares-in-every-major-company-fortune-500 Furthermore, the very strength of The Vanguard Group itself was centered around Index Funds and the thesis of it’s founder that basically you could pick shares ‘randomnly’and have better success than the ‘experts.’http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Vanguard_Group

    ******** (from the article)
    “The people who own the media are the same people who own private prisons”

    (response) There are only 737 companies control 80% of the world’s wealth. http://www.forbes.com/sites/bruceupbin/2011/10/22/the-147-companies-that-control-everything/

    ******** (from the article)
    “Prison industry lobbyists developing and encouraging criminal justice policies to advance financial interests has been well-documented. The most notorious example is
    the Washington-based American Legislative Council, a policy organization funded by CCA and GEO, which successfully championed the incarceration promoting “truth in
    sentencing” and “three-strikes” sentencing laws. ”

    (response) This is true, the source is http://www.thenation.com/article/162478/hidden-history-alec-and-prison-labor#

    ******** (from the article)
    “If the motive of the private prison industry were the goodhearted desire to get hold of inmates as quickly as possible for the purpose of sooner successfully
    rehabilitating them”

    (response) Irrelevant statement considering that this is not and never was the motive for the private prison industry.

    ******** (from the article)
    “maintenance of a 90% occupancy rate would be considered a huge failure, not a functioning prerequisite”

    (response) If prisons are running at a huge loss, or falling apart due to old age then the government could deceptively sell them off. The pre-requisites in the letter
    also stipulate that the buildings must be less than 25 years old and is ready to go without any extra work/money – or is currently housing prisoners.
    http://big.assets.huffingtonpost.com/ccaletter.pdf

    ******** (from the article)
    “Likewise, the largest rise in incarceration that this country has ever seen correlates precisely with early-80′s prison privatization”

    (response) Precisely? In fact, it was the rise in prisoners that led to the first privatisation of a prison, it was not the other way around. It also ignores much of history and Pablo Escabar, The Arellano Felix Organization, the demise of the Black Panthers, the formation of the Cribs and then the Blood and Crips, Freeway Rick and smokeable cocaine, the rise in drug use, crime, violence and toughening of laws which led to things like the Batteram and ‘Hammerhead’ taskforces in which a THOUSAND police would sweep the ghetto on a Friday night and make as many arrests as possible. Most of these arrests were small time offenders, so the police began a new initiative whereby these small crooks could ‘dob in’ a fellow criminal in return for sentence reduction. All these things led to an exponential rise in prison populations, without any influence from hip hop.

    ******** (from the article)
    ” This despite the fact that crime rates actually declined since this time. This decreasing crime rate was pointed out enthusiastically by skeptics eager to debunk last
    year’s anonymous industry insider”

    (response) Which means that the promotion of gangsta rap has done nothing to affect rates of crime, thus debunking the letter itself! Crime declined but the War On
    Drugs escalated. Incarceration Rate, 1980–2005″. U.S. Dept. of Justice, Bureau of Justice Statistics. 2006. Archived from the original on 2007-06-11. Retrieved 2007-06-10.

    ******** (from the article)
    “What wasn’t pointed out was that despite crime rates going down, incarceration rates have skyrocketed”

    (response) At the start of 2008, more than 2.3 million people were incarcerated, more than one in every 100 adults.[52] The current rate is about seven times the 1980
    figure,[53] and over three times the figure in Poland, the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) country with the next highest rate.[54] African
    American males are jailed at about six times the rate of white males and three times the rate of Hispanic males.[50] The country’s high rate of incarceration is largely
    due to drug sentencing guidelines and drug policies.[50][55] http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/War_on_Drugs#cite_note-52

    ******** (from the article)
    “the vast majority of the prisoner increase in the United States has come from African-American and Latino citizen drug arrests.”

    (response) So promoting gangster rap to an ever growing white market has had no impact on white arrests?

    ******** (from the article)
    “Add to this well-documented statistics proving that the so-called “war on drugs” has been waged almost entirely on low-income communities of color”

    (response) Well this comment just proves the reason for his previous statement!!!

    ******** (from the article)
    “where up until just two years ago, cocaine sold in crack form fetched sentences 100 times as lengthy as the exact same amount of cocaine sold in powdered form”

    (response) Once again, this also explans why we had such an increase in prisoners!

    ******** (from the article)
    “In July 2010 the oddly named Fair Sentencing Act was adopted”

    (response) So much for the global companies having massive control over everything!

    ******** (from the article)
    “This is not to suggest that the crack/powder disparity represents the extent of the racism rampant within the incarceration industry.”

    (response) Actually, it does. Further controversy surrounding the 100:1 ratio was a result of its description by some as being racially biased and contributing to a

    disproportionate number of African Americans being sentenced for crack cocaine offenses. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fair_Sentencing_Act

    ******** (from the article)
    “The U.S. Sentencing Commission reported in March 2010 that in the federal prison system, even where convicted for the exact same crimes, people of color received
    prison sentences 10% longer . Where convictions are identical, mandatory minimum sentences are also 21% more likely for people of color”

    (response) This points to racism as the cause of high imprisonment, not gangster rap. Furthermore, it contradicts the previous statement.

    ******** (from the article)
    “Finally, let us not forget the wealth of evidence to support the notion that crime-, drug- and prison-glorifying hip-hop only outsells other hip-hop”

    (response) The link to the “wealth of evidence” is only a link to an article written by the same person. Furthermore, According to Courtland Milloy of The Washington
    Post, for the first time on five years, no rap albums were among the top 10 sellers in 2006. NPR culture critic Elizabeth Blair noted that, “some industry experts say
    young people are fed up with the violence, degrading imagery and lyrics.” http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hip_hop_music

    ******** (from the article)
    “Historical atrocities like slavery and the Holocaust are universally acknowledged”

    (response) Although this is true, it must be remembered that due to ignorance and misinformation many people still deny that the Holocaust existed. I shall also point
    out that the many objectors to these atrocities openly engaged in the battle to restore justice. Anonymous letters with no references, sources or credibility can only
    flame the winds of misinformation. It also takes the blame away from the actual perpetrators of the crimes themselves. It must be said that many criminals do not listen to gangsta rap, and it is also true that many people who adore gangsta rap have completed college and have had long successful careers and happy families.

    ******** (from the article)”There is an abundance of people content to believe that the only conspiracies that ever exist are those that have successfully been exposed.”

    (response) There is an abundance of people who believe that if a conspiracy exists, it CAN be exposed. The two examples given in the article only serve to highlight and
    reinforce this belief.

    That’s my 2 cents. I believe the original letter is fake. Logic tells me that if the corporations and label heads did in fact have this ‘secret’ plan, they would not
    require a ‘secret meeting’ as described in the first place, they could just implement their plans quite easily and choose which records to shelve. Simply no need to
    involve outside parties signing confidentiality agreements. Do the corporations want us in jail? Yes. Do they need to promote gangsta rap to do that? No.

    The original letter writer should start giving names and references or stop spreading misinformation which detracts from the bigger issue of The War On Drugs and people’s respons

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *